«Targeted drug delivery to improve the results of complex treatment of liver failure in abdominal sepsis».

  • Gulyayev, Alexandr (PI)
  • Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay (Co-PI)
  • Kozhakhmetov, Saken (Co-PI)
  • Berikkhanova, Kulzhan (Other Faculty/Researcher)
  • Taǐgulov, E. A. (Other Faculty/Researcher)
  • Daniyeva, Nurgul (Other Faculty/Researcher)
  • Zakirov, Ernur (Other Faculty/Researcher)
  • Sergazy, Shyngys (Other Faculty/Researcher)

Project: CRP

Project Details

Grant Program

Collaborative Research Program 2024-2026

Project Description

The aim of the project is to improve the results of complex treatment of liver failure in abdominal sepsis by targeted drug delivery based on autologous erythrocyte ghosts.
Project Objectives:
1.Creation of cellular transport containers for targeted delivery of hepatoprotectors and antibiotics by encapsulation into autologous erythrocyte ghosts.
2.Conduct biopharmaceutical studies of erythrocyte transport containers by equilibrium dialysis with determination of association/dissociation constants and dynamic stability in vitro.
3.Study of pharmacokinetics of created erythrocyte transport containers with hepatoprotectors, cytokines and antibiotics in laboratory animals.
4.Preclinical study of the effectiveness of targeted delivery of hepatoprotectors, cytokines and antibiotics for the treatment of liver failure in abdominal sepsis in experimental animals in vivo.

Project Impact

Expected results:
1.Cellular systems for targeted delivery of cytokines, hepatoprotectors and antibiotics will be obtained by encapsulation them into autologous erythrocyte ghosts.
2.Biopharmaceutical studies of erythrocyte transport containers will be conducted by equilibrium dialysis with determination of association/dissociation constants and dynamic stability in vitro.
3.Pharmacokinetics study erythrocyte transport containers with selected drugs in laboratory animals will be conducted.
4.Preclinical study of effectiveness of improving the results of complex treatment of liver failure in abdominal sepsis by targeted delivery of cytokines, hepatoprotectors and antibiotics in experimental animals will be conducted.
5.Application for Kazakhstan patent will be submitted.
6.Reports will be presented at international conferences.
7.The research results will be published in peer-reviewed scientific publications indexed in the Science Citation Index Expanded Web of Science database and the Scopus database.
Targeted delivery of selected drugs creates high concentrations of drug in pathological foci, increases clinical efficacy and bioavailability, reduces overall toxicity due to selective distribution. Directed transport of selected drugs can lead to significant improving the effectiveness of treatment, reduce length of hospital stay, reduce treatment cost and have significant economic and social effect.
As result of research on development of cellular systems for targeted delivery of most promising drugs and preclinical trials, it is expected to obtain much-needed experimental data on relatively inexpensive, innovative, more easily transferable to clinical practice technology that can serve as basis for the development of new strategic approaches to improve the results of complex treatment of liver failure in abdominal sepsis.
The use of vehicles to deliver high concentrations of medicines directly to foci of surgical infection is fundamentally new technology that will significantly expand boundaries of treatment not only in surgery, but also in all areas of medicine.
Competitiveness of proposed new medical technology is determined by low cost, as well as high possibility of introduction into clinical practice.
Healthcare, in particular field of surgery, can be indicated as target consumers of results obtained.
Short title liver failure in abdominal sepsis
StatusActive
Effective start/end date1/1/2412/31/26

Keywords

  • targeted drug delivery
  • liver failure
  • abdominal sepsis
  • autologous erythrocyte ghosts
  • multiple organ dysfunction syndrome
  • hepatoprotectors
  • pharmacocytes
  • pharmacokinetics