A model for the prediction of tunnel boring machine performance

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A key factor in the successful application of a Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) in tunnelling is the ability to develop accurate penetration rate estimates for determining project schedule and costs. Rate of penetration (ROP) defining as a distance the machine advances in a given time in rock is a complex process that not only depends upon intact and rock mass properties (strength, fractures, and texture of rock) but also machine specifications including thrust and torque requirement. The Earth Mechanics Institute (EMI) of the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) has developed a model to predict the performance of TBM in hard rock condition. The model is primarily based on intact rock properties and machine specification. Although the model has proven reliable in massive rock conditions, its accuracy has been limited in brittle rocks exhibiting a high degree of fracturing. Therefore, this research was conducted to investigate the affect of rock mass fracture and brittleness on TBM performance. In order to accomplish the goal, extensive mapping of the tunnel was conducted to make a record of the joints and fractures along the 16-kilometer long the Queens Water Tunnel in New York City. A large number of cores were taken from inside the tunnel where rock exhibited varying degrees of fracturing to conduct geomechanical tests including uniaxial compressive strength, tensile strength, and punch penetration tests. Additionally, the field TBM data from the tunnel was analysed in detail. Consequently, the collected machine, rock properties and geological data were then subjected to a multiple regression analysis together with the basic penetration rate derived from the existing model. As a result of research, a new model was purposed for TBM performance prediction.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIAEG2006: Engineering Geology for Tomorrow's Cities: 10th IAEG International Congress
Pages1-10
Number of pages10
Publication statusPublished - 2006
EventIAEG2006: Engineering Geology for Tomorrow's Cities: 10th IAEG International Congress - United Kingdom, Nottingham, United Kingdom
Duration: Sep 6 2006Sep 10 2006

Conference

ConferenceIAEG2006: Engineering Geology for Tomorrow's Cities: 10th IAEG International Congress
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityNottingham
Period9/6/069/10/06

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'A model for the prediction of tunnel boring machine performance'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this