A neonatal perspective on Homo erectus brain growth

Zachary Cofran, Jeremy M. DeSilva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Mojokerto calvaria has been central to assessment of brain growth in Homo erectus, but different analytical approaches and uncertainty in the specimen's age at death have hindered consensus on the nature of H.erectus brain growth. We simulate average annual rates (AR) of absolute endocranial volume (ECV) growth and proportional size change (PSC) in H.erectus, utilizing estimates of H.erectus neonatal ECV and a range of ages for Mojokerto. These values are compared with resampled ARs and PSCs from ontogenetic series of humans, chimpanzees, and gorillas from birth to six years. Results are consistent with other studies of ECV growth in extant taxa. There is extensive overlap in PSC between all living species through the first postnatal year, with continued but lesser overlap between humans and chimpanzees to age six. Human ARs are elevated above those of apes, although there is modest overlap up to 0.50 years. Ape ARs overlap throughout the sequence, with gorillas slightly elevated over chimpanzees up to 0.50 years. Simulated H.erectus PSCs can be found in all living species by 0.50 years, and the median falls below the human and chimpanzee ranges after 2.5 years. H.erectus ARs are elevated above those of all extant taxa prior to 0.50 years, and after two years they fall out of the human range but are still above ape ranges. A review of evidence for the age at death of Mojokerto supports an estimate of around one year, indicating absolute brain growth rates in the lower half of the human range. These results point to secondary altriciality in H.erectus, implying that key human adaptations for increasing the energy budget of females may have been established by at least 1 Ma.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-47
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Human Evolution
Volume81
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2015

Fingerprint

Homo
brain
Pan troglodytes
Pongidae
death
Gorilla
energy budget
budget
uncertainty
energy
Homo Erectus
evidence
Values
Overlap
Chimpanzee
Apes

Keywords

  • Life history
  • Resampling
  • Simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Education

Cite this

A neonatal perspective on Homo erectus brain growth. / Cofran, Zachary; DeSilva, Jeremy M.

In: Journal of Human Evolution, Vol. 81, 01.04.2015, p. 41-47.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cofran, Zachary ; DeSilva, Jeremy M. / A neonatal perspective on Homo erectus brain growth. In: Journal of Human Evolution. 2015 ; Vol. 81. pp. 41-47.
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