A novel combined biomarker including plasma carotenoids, vitamin C, and ferric reducing antioxidant power is more strongly associated with fruit and vegetable intake than the individual components

Yannan Jin, Michael H. Gordon, Dauren Alimbetov, Mary F F Chong, Trevor W. George, Jeremy P E Spencer, Orla B. Kennedy, Kieran Tuohy, Anne Marie Minihane, Julie A. Lovegrove

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Monitoring of fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake is fraught with difficulties. Available dietary assessment methods are associated with considerable error, and the use of biomarkers offers an attractive alternative. Few studies to date have examined the use of plasma biomarkers to monitor or predict the F&V intake of volunteers consuming a wide range of intakes from both habitual F&V and manipulated diets. Objective: This study tested the hypothesis that an integrated biomarker calculated from a combination of plasma vitamin C, cholesterol-adjusted carotenoid concentration and Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP) had more power to predict F&V intake than each individual biomarker. Methods: Data from a randomized controlled dietary intervention study [FLAVURS (Flavonoids University of Reading Study); n = 154] in which the test groups observed sequential increases of 2.3, 3.2, and 4.2 portions of F&Vs every 6 wk across an 18-wk period were used in this study. Results: An integrated plasma biomarker was devised that included plasma vitamin C, total cholesterol-adjusted carotenoids, and FRAP values, which better correlated with F&V intake (r = 0.47, P <0.001) than the individual biomarkers (r = 0.33, P <0.01; r = 0.37, P <0.001; and r = 0.14, respectively; P = 0.099). Inclusion of urinary potassium concentration did not significantly improve the correlation. The integrated plasma biomarker predicted F&V intake more accurately than did plasma total cholesterol-adjusted carotenoid concentration, with the difference being significant at visit 2 (P <0.001) and with a tendency to be significant at visit 1 (P = 0.07). Conclusion: Either plasma total cholesterol-adjusted carotenoid concentration or the integrated biomarker could be used to distinguish between high- and moderate-F&V consumers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1866-1872
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume144
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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Carotenoids
Vegetables
Ascorbic Acid
Fruit
Antioxidants
Biomarkers
Cholesterol
Flavonoids
Reading
Volunteers
Potassium
Diet

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Medicine(all)

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A novel combined biomarker including plasma carotenoids, vitamin C, and ferric reducing antioxidant power is more strongly associated with fruit and vegetable intake than the individual components. / Jin, Yannan; Gordon, Michael H.; Alimbetov, Dauren; Chong, Mary F F; George, Trevor W.; Spencer, Jeremy P E; Kennedy, Orla B.; Tuohy, Kieran; Minihane, Anne Marie; Lovegrove, Julie A.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 144, No. 11, 2014, p. 1866-1872.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jin, Yannan ; Gordon, Michael H. ; Alimbetov, Dauren ; Chong, Mary F F ; George, Trevor W. ; Spencer, Jeremy P E ; Kennedy, Orla B. ; Tuohy, Kieran ; Minihane, Anne Marie ; Lovegrove, Julie A. / A novel combined biomarker including plasma carotenoids, vitamin C, and ferric reducing antioxidant power is more strongly associated with fruit and vegetable intake than the individual components. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2014 ; Vol. 144, No. 11. pp. 1866-1872.
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abstract = "Background: Monitoring of fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake is fraught with difficulties. Available dietary assessment methods are associated with considerable error, and the use of biomarkers offers an attractive alternative. Few studies to date have examined the use of plasma biomarkers to monitor or predict the F&V intake of volunteers consuming a wide range of intakes from both habitual F&V and manipulated diets. Objective: This study tested the hypothesis that an integrated biomarker calculated from a combination of plasma vitamin C, cholesterol-adjusted carotenoid concentration and Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP) had more power to predict F&V intake than each individual biomarker. Methods: Data from a randomized controlled dietary intervention study [FLAVURS (Flavonoids University of Reading Study); n = 154] in which the test groups observed sequential increases of 2.3, 3.2, and 4.2 portions of F&Vs every 6 wk across an 18-wk period were used in this study. Results: An integrated plasma biomarker was devised that included plasma vitamin C, total cholesterol-adjusted carotenoids, and FRAP values, which better correlated with F&V intake (r = 0.47, P <0.001) than the individual biomarkers (r = 0.33, P <0.01; r = 0.37, P <0.001; and r = 0.14, respectively; P = 0.099). Inclusion of urinary potassium concentration did not significantly improve the correlation. The integrated plasma biomarker predicted F&V intake more accurately than did plasma total cholesterol-adjusted carotenoid concentration, with the difference being significant at visit 2 (P <0.001) and with a tendency to be significant at visit 1 (P = 0.07). Conclusion: Either plasma total cholesterol-adjusted carotenoid concentration or the integrated biomarker could be used to distinguish between high- and moderate-F&V consumers.",
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AU - Jin, Yannan

AU - Gordon, Michael H.

AU - Alimbetov, Dauren

AU - Chong, Mary F F

AU - George, Trevor W.

AU - Spencer, Jeremy P E

AU - Kennedy, Orla B.

AU - Tuohy, Kieran

AU - Minihane, Anne Marie

AU - Lovegrove, Julie A.

PY - 2014

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