A short history of nomograms and tables used for thermal radiation calculations

Sean Steward, R. Barry Johnson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The theoretical concept of a perfect thermal radiator, the blackbody, was first introduced by the German physicist Gustav Robert Kirchhoff in 1860. By the latter half of the nineteenth century it had become the object of intense theoretical and experimental investigation. While an attempt at trying to theoretically understand the behavior of radiation emitted from a blackbody was undertaken by many eminent physicists of the day, its solution was not found until 1900 when Max Planck put forward his now famous law for thermal radiation. Today, of course, understanding blackbody behavior is vitally important to many fields including infrared systems, illumination, pyrometry, spectroscopy, astronomy, thermal engineering, cryogenics, and meteorology. Mathematically, the form Planck's law takes is rather cumbersome meaning calculations made with it before the advent of modern computers were rather tedious, dramatically slowing the process of computation. Fortunately, during those early days of the twentieth century researchers quickly realized Planck's equation, and the various functions closely related to it, readily lend themselves to being given a graphical, mechanical, or numerically tabulated form for their evaluation. The first of these computational aids to appear were tables. These arose shortly after Planck introduced his equation, were produced in the greatest number, and remained unsurpassed in their level of accuracy compared to all other aids made. It was also not long before nomograms designed to aid thermal radiation calculations appeared. Essentially a printed chart and requiring nothing more than a straightedge to use, nomograms were cheap and extremely easy to use. Facilitating instant answers to a range of quantities relating to thermal radiation, a number were produced and the inventiveness displayed in some was quite remarkable. In this paper we consider the historical development of many of the nomograms and tables developed and used by generations of scientists and engineers before their sudden and irrevocable decline shortly after the arrival of affordable digital computers and hand-held electronic calculators during the mid-1970s. This work represents a continuation of our earlier work on a number of radiation slide rules developed and used for thermal radiation calculations, with all three of these computational aids being the subject of a forthcoming book.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCurrent Developments in Lens Design and Optical Engineering XVII
EditorsVirendra N. Mahajan, R. Barry Johnson, Simon Thibault
PublisherSPIE
Volume9947
ISBN (Electronic)9781510602861
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2016
EventCurrent Developments in Lens Design and Optical Engineering XVII - San Diego, United States
Duration: Aug 31 2016Sep 1 2016

Other

OtherCurrent Developments in Lens Design and Optical Engineering XVII
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego
Period8/31/169/1/16

Fingerprint

Nomogram
nomographs
Nomograms
Thermal Radiation
Heat radiation
thermal radiation
Blackbody
Tables
histories
Straightedge
Mathematical instruments
Radiation
Pyrometry
calculators
Calculator
Meteorology
digital computers
Astronomy
Radiators
radiators

Keywords

  • Blackbody radiation
  • History
  • Nomograms
  • Planck
  • Radiometry
  • Tables

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Steward, S., & Johnson, R. B. (2016). A short history of nomograms and tables used for thermal radiation calculations. In V. N. Mahajan, R. B. Johnson, & S. Thibault (Eds.), Current Developments in Lens Design and Optical Engineering XVII (Vol. 9947). [994706] SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2236496

A short history of nomograms and tables used for thermal radiation calculations. / Steward, Sean; Johnson, R. Barry.

Current Developments in Lens Design and Optical Engineering XVII. ed. / Virendra N. Mahajan; R. Barry Johnson; Simon Thibault. Vol. 9947 SPIE, 2016. 994706.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Steward, S & Johnson, RB 2016, A short history of nomograms and tables used for thermal radiation calculations. in VN Mahajan, RB Johnson & S Thibault (eds), Current Developments in Lens Design and Optical Engineering XVII. vol. 9947, 994706, SPIE, Current Developments in Lens Design and Optical Engineering XVII, San Diego, United States, 8/31/16. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2236496
Steward S, Johnson RB. A short history of nomograms and tables used for thermal radiation calculations. In Mahajan VN, Johnson RB, Thibault S, editors, Current Developments in Lens Design and Optical Engineering XVII. Vol. 9947. SPIE. 2016. 994706 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2236496
Steward, Sean ; Johnson, R. Barry. / A short history of nomograms and tables used for thermal radiation calculations. Current Developments in Lens Design and Optical Engineering XVII. editor / Virendra N. Mahajan ; R. Barry Johnson ; Simon Thibault. Vol. 9947 SPIE, 2016.
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