Activated carbons and carbon-containing poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogels

Characterization, protein adsorption and possibility of myoglobin clearance

Alexander E. Ivanov, Oleksandr P. Kozynchenko, Lyuba I. Mikhalovska, Stephen R. Tennison, Hans Jungvid, Vladimir M. Gun'Ko, Sergey V. Mikhalovsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adsorption of myoglobin (Mb), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and γ-globulin (GG) onto activated carbons (ACs) with different pore size distributions, and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) monolithic cryogels containing AC particles was studied. The highest initial rate of Mb adsorption was observed for AC having the largest specific surface area (1939 m2 g -1) and pore volume (1.82 cm3 g-1). The adsorption kinetics of proteins was characterized by a bimodal shape of the distribution f(D) function of an effective diffusion coefficient. Adsorption isotherms of Mb and GG were of Freundlich type within the studied range of equilibrium concentrations (10-150 μg mL-1). The distributions of free energy of protein adsorption were bimodal and reflected both interactions with carbon surfaces and self-association of proteins. Adsorbed amounts of Mb were the highest among the proteins studied (up to 700 mg g-1 carbon), which was attributed to the higher fraction of pores accessible for Mb. Incorporation of carbon particles into PVA-based cryogel resulted in macroporous monolithic composite materials (AC-PVA) exhibiting good flow-through properties. Scanning electron microscopy of the composites showed macroporous aggregates of carbon particles held together by films and bridges of PVA. The rates of adsorption and adsorbed amounts of proteins on AC-PVA were reduced compared to the pristine carbon and depended on the carbon content in the composites. Nevertheless, adsorption of Mb on AC-PVA took place even in the presence of 500-fold higher concentration of BSA. This indicated a possibility of Mb clearance from blood plasma using the PVA-carbon monoliths.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)16267-16278
Number of pages12
JournalPhysical Chemistry Chemical Physics
Volume14
Issue number47
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 14 2012

Fingerprint

Cryogels
myoglobin
Myoglobin
clearances
activated carbon
Activated carbon
alcohols
Carbon
Alcohols
proteins
Adsorption
adsorption
carbon
Proteins
Bovine Serum Albumin
porosity
albumins
serums
composite materials
Composite materials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Ivanov, A. E., Kozynchenko, O. P., Mikhalovska, L. I., Tennison, S. R., Jungvid, H., Gun'Ko, V. M., & Mikhalovsky, S. V. (2012). Activated carbons and carbon-containing poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogels: Characterization, protein adsorption and possibility of myoglobin clearance. Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, 14(47), 16267-16278. https://doi.org/10.1039/c2cp42869e

Activated carbons and carbon-containing poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogels : Characterization, protein adsorption and possibility of myoglobin clearance. / Ivanov, Alexander E.; Kozynchenko, Oleksandr P.; Mikhalovska, Lyuba I.; Tennison, Stephen R.; Jungvid, Hans; Gun'Ko, Vladimir M.; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V.

In: Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, Vol. 14, No. 47, 14.12.2012, p. 16267-16278.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ivanov, AE, Kozynchenko, OP, Mikhalovska, LI, Tennison, SR, Jungvid, H, Gun'Ko, VM & Mikhalovsky, SV 2012, 'Activated carbons and carbon-containing poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogels: Characterization, protein adsorption and possibility of myoglobin clearance', Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, vol. 14, no. 47, pp. 16267-16278. https://doi.org/10.1039/c2cp42869e
Ivanov, Alexander E. ; Kozynchenko, Oleksandr P. ; Mikhalovska, Lyuba I. ; Tennison, Stephen R. ; Jungvid, Hans ; Gun'Ko, Vladimir M. ; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V. / Activated carbons and carbon-containing poly(vinyl alcohol) cryogels : Characterization, protein adsorption and possibility of myoglobin clearance. In: Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics. 2012 ; Vol. 14, No. 47. pp. 16267-16278.
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