Acute acalculous cholecystitis associated with severe EBV hepatitis in an immunocompetent child

Dimitri Poddighe, Giacomo Cagnoli, Nunzia Mastricci, Paola Bruni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Acute acalculous cholecystitis (AAC) is an inflammation of the gallbladder in the absence of demonstrated stones, which is rarely seen in paediatric population. The diagnosis is accomplished mainly through abdominal ultrasonography in the appropriate but usually non-specific clinical picture. Complicated cases need surgical intervention; the medical management is mainly constituted by supportive and antibiotic therapy, as most AAC are observed in the setting of systemic bacterial or parasitic infections. However, AAC has been rarely reported in association with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, where the gastrointestinal involvement is often mild and thus unrecognised. We report a case of EBV-related AAC associated with unusually severe hepatitis in an immunocompetent and otherwise healthy patient. We describe its benign clinical course, despite the serious liver impairment, by a medical management characterised by the prompt discontinuation of broad-spectrum antibiotics, as soon as EBV aetiology is ascertained, and by the appropriate analgesia and fluid resuscitation.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBMJ Case Reports
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 13 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Acalculous Cholecystitis
Acute Cholecystitis
Human Herpesvirus 4
Hepatitis
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Parasitic Diseases
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections
Cholecystitis
Bacterial Infections
Resuscitation
Analgesia
Ultrasonography
Pediatrics
Liver
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Acute acalculous cholecystitis associated with severe EBV hepatitis in an immunocompetent child. / Poddighe, Dimitri; Cagnoli, Giacomo; Mastricci, Nunzia; Bruni, Paola.

In: BMJ Case Reports, 13.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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