Additive impacts on particle emissions from heating low emitting cooking oils

M. Amouei Torkmahalleh, Y. Zhao, P. K. Hopke, A. Rossner, A. R. Ferro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect of five additives, including table salt, sea salt, black pepper, garlic powder, and turmeric, on the emission of PM2.5 and ultrafine particles (UFP) from heated cooking oil (200°C) were studied. One hundred milligrams of the additives were added individually to either canola or soybean oil without stirring. Black pepper, table salt, and sea salt reduced the PM2.5 emission of canola oil by 86% (p<0.001), 88% (p<0.001), and 91% (p<0.001), respectively. Black pepper, table salt, and sea salt also decreased the total particle number emissions of canola oil by 45% (p=0.003), 52% (p=0.001), and 53% (p<0.001), respectively. Turmeric and garlic powder showed no changes in the PM2.5 and total number emissions of canola oil. Tablesalt and sea salt, decreased the level of PM2.5 emissions from soybean oil by 47% (p<0.001) and 77% (p<0.001), respectively. No differences in the PM2.5 emissions were observed when other additives were added to soybean oil. Black pepper, sea salt, and table salt reduced the total particle number emissions from the soybean oil by 51%, 61% and 68% (p<0.001), respectively. Turmeric and garlic powder had no effect on soybean oil with respect to total particle number emissions. Our results indicate that table salt, sea salt, and black pepper can be used to reduce the particle total number and PM2.5 emissions when cooking with oil.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)194-198
Number of pages5
JournalAtmospheric Environment
Volume74
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2013

Keywords

  • Cooking
  • Indoor atmospheres
  • Oil
  • PM
  • Ultrafine particles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Atmospheric Science

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