An analysis of site-specific attributable pathologies for colorectal symptoms

Diagnostic yield of colonoscopy

A. P. Zbar, M. Pignatelli, D. Sherman, P. Toomey, W. A. Kmiot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this prospective study was to audit the diagnostic yield of colonoscopy for an unselected cohort of patients referred with lower intestinal symptoms. Seven hundred and forty-four consecutive patients over a 12-month period were analysed. The main reasons for referral included rectal bleeding, iron deficiency anaemia, altered bowel habit, abdominal pain, colonoscopic follow up (for colitis, prior endoscopic polypectomy and after colorectal cancer resection) and screening (positive family history of colorectal cancer). Rectal bleeding had a diagnostic yield of 69.4% (neoplastic yield of 23.8%). Over 50% of patients with anaemia had normal colonoscopies (23.7% yield for colorectal neoplasia). Only one carcinoma was found in 133 patients colonoscoped for abdominal pain or altered bowel habit (0.75%). New carcinoma diagnoses were made in 1.6% (1/59) of patients followed up after cancer resection and in 1.5% of those patients with prior endoscopic polypectomy (1/65). Colonoscopy is valuable as a routine investigation in patients presenting with rectal bleeding or iron deficiency anaemia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)234-237
Number of pages4
JournalColorectal Disease
Volume1
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Colonoscopy
Pathology
Iron-Deficiency Anemias
Hemorrhage
Abdominal Pain
Habits
Colorectal Neoplasms
Carcinoma
Colitis
Early Detection of Cancer
Anemia
Neoplasms
Referral and Consultation
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • Carcinoma of colon
  • Colonoscopy
  • Rectal bleeding

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

An analysis of site-specific attributable pathologies for colorectal symptoms : Diagnostic yield of colonoscopy. / Zbar, A. P.; Pignatelli, M.; Sherman, D.; Toomey, P.; Kmiot, W. A.

In: Colorectal Disease, Vol. 1, No. 4, 1999, p. 234-237.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zbar, A. P. ; Pignatelli, M. ; Sherman, D. ; Toomey, P. ; Kmiot, W. A. / An analysis of site-specific attributable pathologies for colorectal symptoms : Diagnostic yield of colonoscopy. In: Colorectal Disease. 1999 ; Vol. 1, No. 4. pp. 234-237.
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