Apoptotic and genotoxic effects of low-intensity ultrasound on healthy and leukemic human peripheral mononuclear blood cells

Timur Saliev, Dinara Begimbetova, Dinara Baiskhanova, Danysh Abetov, Ulykbek Kairov, Charles P Gilman, Bakhyt Matkarimov, Katsuro Tachibana

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To scrutinize the apoptotic and genotoxic effects of low-intensity ultrasound and an ultrasound contrast agent (SonoVue; Bracco Diagnostics Inc., EU) on human peripheral mononuclear blood cells (PMBCs).

METHODS: PMBCs were subjected to a low-intensity ultrasound field (1-MHz frequency; spatial peak temporal average intensity 0.18 W/cm2) followed by analysis for apoptosis and DNA damage (single-strand breaks + double-strand breaks). The comet assay was then repeated after 2 h to examine the ability of cells to repair DNA breaks.

RESULTS: The results demonstrated that low-intensity ultrasound was capable of selectively inducing apoptosis in leukemic PMBCs, but not in healthy cells. The introduction of ultrasound contrast agent SonoVue resulted in an increase in apoptosis in both groups. DNA analysis after ultrasound exposure indicated that ultrasound triggered DNA damage in leukemic PMBCs (66.05 ± 13.36%), while the damage was minimal (7.01 ± 0.89%) in control PMBCs. However, both cell lines demonstrated an ability to repair DNA single- and double-strand breaks 2 h after sonication.

CONCLUSIONS: The study demonstrated that low-intensity ultrasound selectively induced apoptosis in cancer PMBCs. Ultrasound-induced DNA damage was observed primarily in leukemic PMBCs. Nevertheless, both cell lines were able to repair ultrasound-mediated DNA strand breaks.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of medical ultrasonics (2001)
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - Jul 8 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Journal Article

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