Arts-based online focus groups: Exploring the transition from docmama to motherscholar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Using a collaborative, arts-based online focus groups, this study sought to understand the transition from doctoral student mother to a future career as motherscholar. Unique to this work is the longitudinal nature of examining academic motherhood through an integration of arts-based methods to expand upon understanding and sharing with a greater audience (Leavy, 2015). The study addresses the potential and the cautions for the use of arts-based online focus groups, while also reporting on the key themes of the transition to motherscholar. Drawing from sociocultural theory (Holland, Skinner, Lachiocotte, & Cain, 1998), transformative learning (Cranton, 1994; Mezirow, 1991), presentation of self (Goffman, 1959), and key definitions of motherhood/mothering, mother/scholar, and Feminist/matricentric theory, data analysis showed two key themes: “strategies of work and family” and “determining where life ‘fits’ in.” An unexpected finding emerged indicating a separation and dynamic movement between the roles and identities, of mother and scholar. Findings suggest that the use of arts-based online focus groups within a friendship context can provide ongoing, dynamic opportunities for communication, interaction, and sharing of experience for those living in geographically distant locations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1720-1735
JournalQualitative Report
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2018

Keywords

  • doctoral student
  • motherhood
  • graduate student
  • mother
  • mother-scholar
  • emerging qualitative research
  • arts-based research
  • gender
  • online research
  • qualitative research
  • gender studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

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