Bringing them in: The experiences of imported and overseas-qualified teachers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This qualitative multiple-site case study explores the experiences of imported and overseas-qualified teachers appointed to fill 'difficult-to-staff Western Australian rural schools. In a climate of global teacher shortages, investigation of the strategies adopted to solve this problem requires empirical examination. The study of six imported and overseas-qualified teachers found that they experienced difficulties with the employment application process, were not adequately inducted into the system and experienced difficulties with cultural adaptation related to pedagogy, behaviour management and language. These teachers still remained in schools for lengths of time comparable to their Australian-born counterparts. Transitions into schools could be assisted with improved appointment processes, induction and school-based support. A research agenda for further investigation of this field is recommended.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)192-206
Number of pages15
JournalAustralian Journal of Education
Volume53
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2009

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overseas
teacher
teacher shortage
school
experience
rural school
induction
climate
staff
examination
language
management
time

Keywords

  • Imported teachers
  • Migrant teachers
  • Rural education
  • Teacher background
  • Teacher mobility
  • Teacher recruitment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Bringing them in : The experiences of imported and overseas-qualified teachers. / Sharplin, Elaine.

In: Australian Journal of Education, Vol. 53, No. 2, 01.01.2009, p. 192-206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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