Cancer stem cells

The potential role of autophagy, proteolysis, and cathepsins in glioblastoma stem cells

Joachim Bischof, Mike-Andrew Westhoff, Johanna Elisabeth Wagner, Marc-Eric Halatsch, Stephanie Trentmann, Uwe Knippschild, Christian Rainer Wirtz, Timo Burster

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One major obstacle in cancer therapy is chemoresistance leading to tumor recurrence and metastasis. Cancer stem cells, in particular glioblastoma stem cells, are highly resistant to chemotherapy, radiation, and immune recognition. In case of immune recognition, several survival mechanisms including, regulation of autophagy, proteases, and cell surface major histocompatibility complex class I molecules, are found in glioblastoma stem cells. In different pathways, cathepsins play a crucial role in processing functional proteins that are necessary for several processes and proper cell function. Consequently, strategies targeting these pathways in glioblastoma stem cells are promising approaches to interfere with tumor cell survival and will be discussed in this review.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1010428317692227
JournalTumor Biology
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cathepsins
Neoplastic Stem Cells
Autophagy
Glioblastoma
Proteolysis
Stem Cells
Neoplasms
Major Histocompatibility Complex
Cell Survival
Peptide Hydrolases
Radiation
Neoplasm Metastasis
Recurrence
Drug Therapy
Proteins
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Animals
  • Autophagy
  • Brain Neoplasms
  • Cathepsins
  • Glioblastoma
  • Humans
  • Neoplastic Stem Cells
  • Proteolysis
  • Journal Article
  • Review

Cite this

Bischof, J., Westhoff, M-A., Wagner, J. E., Halatsch, M-E., Trentmann, S., Knippschild, U., ... Burster, T. (2017). Cancer stem cells: The potential role of autophagy, proteolysis, and cathepsins in glioblastoma stem cells. Tumor Biology, 39(3), 1010428317692227. https://doi.org/10.1177/1010428317692227

Cancer stem cells : The potential role of autophagy, proteolysis, and cathepsins in glioblastoma stem cells. / Bischof, Joachim; Westhoff, Mike-Andrew; Wagner, Johanna Elisabeth; Halatsch, Marc-Eric; Trentmann, Stephanie; Knippschild, Uwe; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Burster, Timo.

In: Tumor Biology, Vol. 39, No. 3, 03.2017, p. 1010428317692227.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Bischof, J, Westhoff, M-A, Wagner, JE, Halatsch, M-E, Trentmann, S, Knippschild, U, Wirtz, CR & Burster, T 2017, 'Cancer stem cells: The potential role of autophagy, proteolysis, and cathepsins in glioblastoma stem cells', Tumor Biology, vol. 39, no. 3, pp. 1010428317692227. https://doi.org/10.1177/1010428317692227
Bischof J, Westhoff M-A, Wagner JE, Halatsch M-E, Trentmann S, Knippschild U et al. Cancer stem cells: The potential role of autophagy, proteolysis, and cathepsins in glioblastoma stem cells. Tumor Biology. 2017 Mar;39(3):1010428317692227. https://doi.org/10.1177/1010428317692227
Bischof, Joachim ; Westhoff, Mike-Andrew ; Wagner, Johanna Elisabeth ; Halatsch, Marc-Eric ; Trentmann, Stephanie ; Knippschild, Uwe ; Wirtz, Christian Rainer ; Burster, Timo. / Cancer stem cells : The potential role of autophagy, proteolysis, and cathepsins in glioblastoma stem cells. In: Tumor Biology. 2017 ; Vol. 39, No. 3. pp. 1010428317692227.
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