Computation of shock/boundary-layer interactions in bump channels with transport-type turbulence models

Y. Zhao, Z. M. Ding

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper, an explicit time-marching finite-volume scheme has been used together with a number of convergence acceleration techniques such as the multigrid strategy. Two types of turbulence models, a Johnson-King (J-K) model and a two-layer k-ε/k-l model, have been incorporated and modified to model internal compressible flows with multiple walls. Some modifications have been made of the inner layer viscosity formulations of the J-K model in order to improve its predictive capability for flow separation. Partially implicit treatment of the transport-type equations of turbulence in the models is adopted, because the source terms in these equations can cause numerical stiffness when there are flow separation, sharp gradients and high cell-aspect ratio near the solid wall. A two-dimensional arc-bump flow investigated experimentally by Liu and Squire [X. Liu and L.C. Squire, Interaction on curved surface at transonic speed, in: Turbulent Shear/Shock Wave Interactions, IUTAM Symposium Palaiseau 1985 (Springer, Berlin Heidelberg, 1985) 93-104.] was calculated using the J-K model with satisfactory agreement with the corresponding measurement. Although efficient and accurate, it is found that the J-K model lacks the theoretical generality to be extended to model three-dimensional (3D) complex internal flows with multiple walls. Therefore, a two-layer k-ε model is employed for 3D flow computation. Various measures are adopted to ensure stable and convergent numerical solution. A three-dimensional transonic channel flow with multiple shock/boundary layer interactions was studied with the aforementioned two-layer model and numerical methods. The results are compared with experimental measurements [J. Cahen, V. Couaillier, J. Delery and T. Pot, Validation of Navier-Stokes code using a k-ε turbulence model applied to a three-dimensional transonic tunnel, AIAA paper AIAA-93-0293, AIAA, 1993] and numerical results obtained by using a Low-Reynolds-Number (LRN) k-ε model [VUB/FFA, Turbulence Models in EURANUS and the 3D Delery bump, Technical Report SNWP3.3/01, VUB, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels, Belgium and FFA, P.O. Box 11021, S-161 11 Bromma, Sweden, 1993]. Compared with other (LRN) two-equation models, the two-layer model implemented is promising in modeling very complex 3D internal flows in terms of efficiency, robustness and accuracy. The two-layer model permits uniform distribution of flow properties to be specified as initial condition which makes the simulation easier to be carried out.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-69
Number of pages15
JournalComputer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering
Volume173
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 23 1999
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

turbulence models
Turbulence models
boundary layers
Boundary layers
shock
interactions
internal flow
flow separation
transonic flow
low Reynolds number
Flow separation
transonic speed
shock wave interaction
Reynolds number
time marching
Belgium
compressible flow
curved surfaces
Sweden
three dimensional models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Computational Mechanics

Cite this

Computation of shock/boundary-layer interactions in bump channels with transport-type turbulence models. / Zhao, Y.; Ding, Z. M.

In: Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering, Vol. 173, No. 1-2, 23.04.1999, p. 55-69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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