Cultivating the Steppe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The main part of this article is presented in two sections. The first considers the practices for cultivating grain introduced by Mennonite farmers in Molotschna in the 1830s; the second analyzes the wider contexts in which the Mennonites developed the practices and the motivations behind them. The article is based on a range of primary sources including reports by Mennonite leaders to the Russian authorities, studies of Mennonite agriculture by visiting specialists, and articles by Mennonite and Russian authors published in contemporary Russian agricultural periodicals and preserved in archives in Russia and Ukraine. It also draws on the recent edition of the correspondence of pioneering Mennonite farmer and leader Johann Cornies. Reference is made to a selection of the extensive secondary literature on the Mennonite colonies and steppe farming. In keeping with recent Ukrainian scholarship, the Mennonites are considered as part of the wider population of southern Ukraine.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-34
Number of pages34
JournalJournal of Mennonite Studies
Volume35
Publication statusPublished - Feb 22 2017

Fingerprint

Mennonites
Farmers
Ukraine
Steppe
Agriculture
Russia
Secondary Literature
Russian Authors
1830s
Authority
Farming
Primary Source
Colonies

Keywords

  • Mennonites
  • Agriculture
  • Steppe
  • Ukraine
  • History

Cite this

Cultivating the Steppe. / Moon, David Gerard.

In: Journal of Mennonite Studies, Vol. 35, 22.02.2017, p. 1-34.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e494966d79b94ebbb59f2c85ef367dfe,
title = "Cultivating the Steppe",
abstract = "The main part of this article is presented in two sections. The first considers the practices for cultivating grain introduced by Mennonite farmers in Molotschna in the 1830s; the second analyzes the wider contexts in which the Mennonites developed the practices and the motivations behind them. The article is based on a range of primary sources including reports by Mennonite leaders to the Russian authorities, studies of Mennonite agriculture by visiting specialists, and articles by Mennonite and Russian authors published in contemporary Russian agricultural periodicals and preserved in archives in Russia and Ukraine. It also draws on the recent edition of the correspondence of pioneering Mennonite farmer and leader Johann Cornies. Reference is made to a selection of the extensive secondary literature on the Mennonite colonies and steppe farming. In keeping with recent Ukrainian scholarship, the Mennonites are considered as part of the wider population of southern Ukraine.",
keywords = "Mennonites, Agriculture, Steppe, Ukraine, History",
author = "Moon, {David Gerard}",
note = "The subtitle was revised by the journal editor after the text of the article was agreed, hence the difference between the published title and that on the text attached.",
year = "2017",
month = "2",
day = "22",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "1--34",
journal = "Journal of Mennonite Studies",
issn = "0824-5053",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cultivating the Steppe

AU - Moon, David Gerard

N1 - The subtitle was revised by the journal editor after the text of the article was agreed, hence the difference between the published title and that on the text attached.

PY - 2017/2/22

Y1 - 2017/2/22

N2 - The main part of this article is presented in two sections. The first considers the practices for cultivating grain introduced by Mennonite farmers in Molotschna in the 1830s; the second analyzes the wider contexts in which the Mennonites developed the practices and the motivations behind them. The article is based on a range of primary sources including reports by Mennonite leaders to the Russian authorities, studies of Mennonite agriculture by visiting specialists, and articles by Mennonite and Russian authors published in contemporary Russian agricultural periodicals and preserved in archives in Russia and Ukraine. It also draws on the recent edition of the correspondence of pioneering Mennonite farmer and leader Johann Cornies. Reference is made to a selection of the extensive secondary literature on the Mennonite colonies and steppe farming. In keeping with recent Ukrainian scholarship, the Mennonites are considered as part of the wider population of southern Ukraine.

AB - The main part of this article is presented in two sections. The first considers the practices for cultivating grain introduced by Mennonite farmers in Molotschna in the 1830s; the second analyzes the wider contexts in which the Mennonites developed the practices and the motivations behind them. The article is based on a range of primary sources including reports by Mennonite leaders to the Russian authorities, studies of Mennonite agriculture by visiting specialists, and articles by Mennonite and Russian authors published in contemporary Russian agricultural periodicals and preserved in archives in Russia and Ukraine. It also draws on the recent edition of the correspondence of pioneering Mennonite farmer and leader Johann Cornies. Reference is made to a selection of the extensive secondary literature on the Mennonite colonies and steppe farming. In keeping with recent Ukrainian scholarship, the Mennonites are considered as part of the wider population of southern Ukraine.

KW - Mennonites

KW - Agriculture

KW - Steppe

KW - Ukraine

KW - History

M3 - Article

VL - 35

SP - 1

EP - 34

JO - Journal of Mennonite Studies

JF - Journal of Mennonite Studies

SN - 0824-5053

ER -