Curriculum and national identity: Exploring the links between religion and nation in Pakistan

Naureen Durrani, Máiréad Dunne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper investigates the relationship between schooling and conflict in Pakistan using an identity-construction lens. Drawing on data from curriculum documents, student responses to classroom activities, and single-sex student focus groups, it explores how students in four state primary schools in the North West Frontier Province (NWFP), Pakistan, use curricula and school experiences to make sense of themselves as Pakistani. The findings suggest that the complex nexus of education, religion, and national identity tends to construct 'essentialist' collective identities-a single identity as a naturalized defining feature of the collective self. To promote national unity across the diverse ethnic groups comprising Pakistan, the national curriculum uses religion (Islam) as the key boundary between the Muslim Pakistani 'self' and the antagonist non-Muslim 'other'. Ironically, this emphasis creates social polarization and the normalization of militaristic and violent identities, with serious implications for social cohesion, tolerance for internal and external diversity, and gender relations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)215-240
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Curriculum Studies
Volume42
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

national identity
Pakistan
Religion
curriculum
national unity
student
collective identity
social cohesion
gender relations
normalization
polarization
Islam
tolerance
primary school
Muslim
ethnic group
classroom
school
education
experience

Keywords

  • Conflict
  • Curriculum
  • Identity construction
  • National unity
  • Pakistan

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

Curriculum and national identity : Exploring the links between religion and nation in Pakistan. / Durrani, Naureen; Dunne, Máiréad.

In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, Vol. 42, No. 2, 01.04.2010, p. 215-240.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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