Do solitary, seismic signalling Cape mole-rats (Georychus capensis) demonstrate spontaneous or induced ovulation?

James H.D.T. Van Sandwyk, Nigel C. Bennett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Cape mole-rat Georychus capensis is a solitary subterranean rodent that exhibits seasonal reproduction. This study set out to determine whether the female Cape mole-rat is an induced or spontaneous ovulator. Eleven females were collected from the field just before the breeding season and housed individually. Urine was collected for 5 weeks. Females were subjected to one of three trials: housed separately without a male; allowed only non-physical contact with unvasectomized males; placed in direct contact with four vasectomized males. Urine was collected for a further 5 weeks and urinary progesterone profiles established. Females housed in direct contact with males exhibited heightened progesterone concentrations and the presence of corpora lutea in their ovaries. The act of coitus seems to be necessary for ovulation to occur in the females even though males were not capable of fertilization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-80
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Zoology
Volume267
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1 2005

Keywords

  • Bathyergidae
  • Cape mole-rat
  • Georychus
  • Induced ovulation
  • Progesterone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Animal Science and Zoology

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