Effect of fine particles on cement treated sand

Ganapathiraman Vinoth, Sung-Woo Moon, Jong Kim, Taeseo Ku

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Cement treated sand improves mechanical properties through the cementitious bonding between cohesionless particles, thus allowing several geotechnical applications such as soil stabilization against slope failure and liquefaction. Since pure sand without any fine particles is seldom available in nature, this study aims to investigate the effect of fine particles (kaolin) in a very small proportion (<5%) on cement treated sand. Two types of cements are used: (i) Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and (ii) Calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA). OPC is the widely used cementitious binder whereas CSA is a rapid hardening cement that is becoming popular due to its low carbon foot print. Three different cement contents (3%, 5% and 7%) and four different fine contents (0%, 1%, 3% and 5%) for each cement content are chosen. The stiffness and strength of the cement treated sands are measured through shear wave velocity and unconfined compressive strength respectively, after 1-day and 7-day curing periods. The results show that the influence of fine particles is visible even with fine content as low as 1%. However, the effect is different between the two types of cements used and between low and high cement contents. As the fine content increases, the increase in strength and stiffness is more for OPC than CSA and more significant at low cement content (3%) than high cement content (5% and 7%).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)847-851
Number of pages5
JournalSpringer Series in Geomechanics and Geoengineering
Issue number216849
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 1 2018
EventChina-Europe Conference on Geotechnical Engineering, 2016 - Vienna, Austria
Duration: Aug 13 2016Aug 16 2016

Fingerprint

Cements
cement
Sand
sand
Portland cement
Calcium
particle
effect
calcium
Stiffness
stiffness
Carbon footprint
Kaolin
Shear waves
soil stabilization
Liquefaction
carbon footprint
Compressive strength
Binders
slope failure

Keywords

  • Calcium sulfoaluminate
  • Cemented sand
  • Fine particles
  • Shear wave velocity
  • Unconfined compressive strength

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology
  • Mechanics of Materials

Cite this

Effect of fine particles on cement treated sand. / Vinoth, Ganapathiraman; Moon, Sung-Woo; Kim, Jong; Ku, Taeseo.

In: Springer Series in Geomechanics and Geoengineering, No. 216849, 01.01.2018, p. 847-851.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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