Efficient separation and sensitive detection of Listeria monocytogenes using an impedance immunosensor based on magnetic nanoparticles, a microfluidic chip, and an interdigitated microelectrode

Damira A. Kanayeva, Ronghui Wang, Douglas Rhoads, Gisela F. Erf, Michael F. Slavik, Steve Tung, Yanbin Li

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    33 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Listeria monocytogenes continues to be a major foodborne pathogen that causes food poisoning, and sometimes death, among immunosuppressed people and abortion among pregnant women. In this study, magnetic nanoparticles with a diameter of 30 nm were functionalized with anti-L. monocytogenes antibodies via biotin-streptavidin bonds to become immunomagnetic nanoparticles (IMNPs) to capture L. monocytogenes in a sample during a 2-h immunoreaction. A magnetic separator was used to collect and hold the IMNPs-L. monocytogenes complex while the supernatants were removed. After the washing step, the nanoparticle-L. monocytogenes complex was separated from the sample and injected into a microfluidic chip. The impedance change caused by L. monocytogenes was measured by an impedance analyzer through the interdigitated microelectrode in the microfluidic chip. For L. monocytogenes in phosphate-buffered saline solution, up to 75%of the cells in the sample could be separated, and as few as three to five cells in the microfluidic chip could be detected, which is equivalent to 103 CFU/ml of cells in the original sample. The detection of L. monocytogenes was not interfered with by other major foodborne bacteria, including E. coli O157:H7, E. coli K-12, L. innocua, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus. A linear correlation (R2 = 0.86) was found between the impedance change and the number of L. monocytogenes in a range of 103 to 107 CFU/ml. Equivalent circuit analysis indicated that the impedance change was mainly due to the decrease in medium resistance when the IMNPs-L. monocytogenes complexes existed in mannitol solution. Finally, the immunosensor was evaluated with food sample tests; the results showed that, without preenrichment and labeling, 104 and 105 CFU/ml L. monocytogenes in lettuce, milk, and ground beef samples could be detected in 3 h.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1951-1959
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of Food Protection
    Volume75
    Issue number11
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2012

    Fingerprint

    Microfluidics
    impedance
    Listeria monocytogenes
    Microelectrodes
    nanoparticles
    Electric Impedance
    Nanoparticles
    sampling
    immunosensors
    streptavidin
    Lettuce
    separators
    Foodborne Diseases
    Escherichia coli O157
    Streptavidin
    ground beef
    Mannitol
    cells
    pregnant women
    biotin

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Food Science
    • Microbiology

    Cite this

    Efficient separation and sensitive detection of Listeria monocytogenes using an impedance immunosensor based on magnetic nanoparticles, a microfluidic chip, and an interdigitated microelectrode. / Kanayeva, Damira A.; Wang, Ronghui; Rhoads, Douglas; Erf, Gisela F.; Slavik, Michael F.; Tung, Steve; Li, Yanbin.

    In: Journal of Food Protection, Vol. 75, No. 11, 11.2012, p. 1951-1959.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{31bb8fb810ab4178beb2a30ed23420bc,
    title = "Efficient separation and sensitive detection of Listeria monocytogenes using an impedance immunosensor based on magnetic nanoparticles, a microfluidic chip, and an interdigitated microelectrode",
    abstract = "Listeria monocytogenes continues to be a major foodborne pathogen that causes food poisoning, and sometimes death, among immunosuppressed people and abortion among pregnant women. In this study, magnetic nanoparticles with a diameter of 30 nm were functionalized with anti-L. monocytogenes antibodies via biotin-streptavidin bonds to become immunomagnetic nanoparticles (IMNPs) to capture L. monocytogenes in a sample during a 2-h immunoreaction. A magnetic separator was used to collect and hold the IMNPs-L. monocytogenes complex while the supernatants were removed. After the washing step, the nanoparticle-L. monocytogenes complex was separated from the sample and injected into a microfluidic chip. The impedance change caused by L. monocytogenes was measured by an impedance analyzer through the interdigitated microelectrode in the microfluidic chip. For L. monocytogenes in phosphate-buffered saline solution, up to 75{\%}of the cells in the sample could be separated, and as few as three to five cells in the microfluidic chip could be detected, which is equivalent to 103 CFU/ml of cells in the original sample. The detection of L. monocytogenes was not interfered with by other major foodborne bacteria, including E. coli O157:H7, E. coli K-12, L. innocua, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus. A linear correlation (R2 = 0.86) was found between the impedance change and the number of L. monocytogenes in a range of 103 to 107 CFU/ml. Equivalent circuit analysis indicated that the impedance change was mainly due to the decrease in medium resistance when the IMNPs-L. monocytogenes complexes existed in mannitol solution. Finally, the immunosensor was evaluated with food sample tests; the results showed that, without preenrichment and labeling, 104 and 105 CFU/ml L. monocytogenes in lettuce, milk, and ground beef samples could be detected in 3 h.",
    author = "Kanayeva, {Damira A.} and Ronghui Wang and Douglas Rhoads and Erf, {Gisela F.} and Slavik, {Michael F.} and Steve Tung and Yanbin Li",
    year = "2012",
    month = "11",
    doi = "10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-11-516",
    language = "English",
    volume = "75",
    pages = "1951--1959",
    journal = "Journal of Food Protection",
    issn = "0362-028X",
    publisher = "International Association for Food Protection",
    number = "11",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Efficient separation and sensitive detection of Listeria monocytogenes using an impedance immunosensor based on magnetic nanoparticles, a microfluidic chip, and an interdigitated microelectrode

    AU - Kanayeva, Damira A.

    AU - Wang, Ronghui

    AU - Rhoads, Douglas

    AU - Erf, Gisela F.

    AU - Slavik, Michael F.

    AU - Tung, Steve

    AU - Li, Yanbin

    PY - 2012/11

    Y1 - 2012/11

    N2 - Listeria monocytogenes continues to be a major foodborne pathogen that causes food poisoning, and sometimes death, among immunosuppressed people and abortion among pregnant women. In this study, magnetic nanoparticles with a diameter of 30 nm were functionalized with anti-L. monocytogenes antibodies via biotin-streptavidin bonds to become immunomagnetic nanoparticles (IMNPs) to capture L. monocytogenes in a sample during a 2-h immunoreaction. A magnetic separator was used to collect and hold the IMNPs-L. monocytogenes complex while the supernatants were removed. After the washing step, the nanoparticle-L. monocytogenes complex was separated from the sample and injected into a microfluidic chip. The impedance change caused by L. monocytogenes was measured by an impedance analyzer through the interdigitated microelectrode in the microfluidic chip. For L. monocytogenes in phosphate-buffered saline solution, up to 75%of the cells in the sample could be separated, and as few as three to five cells in the microfluidic chip could be detected, which is equivalent to 103 CFU/ml of cells in the original sample. The detection of L. monocytogenes was not interfered with by other major foodborne bacteria, including E. coli O157:H7, E. coli K-12, L. innocua, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus. A linear correlation (R2 = 0.86) was found between the impedance change and the number of L. monocytogenes in a range of 103 to 107 CFU/ml. Equivalent circuit analysis indicated that the impedance change was mainly due to the decrease in medium resistance when the IMNPs-L. monocytogenes complexes existed in mannitol solution. Finally, the immunosensor was evaluated with food sample tests; the results showed that, without preenrichment and labeling, 104 and 105 CFU/ml L. monocytogenes in lettuce, milk, and ground beef samples could be detected in 3 h.

    AB - Listeria monocytogenes continues to be a major foodborne pathogen that causes food poisoning, and sometimes death, among immunosuppressed people and abortion among pregnant women. In this study, magnetic nanoparticles with a diameter of 30 nm were functionalized with anti-L. monocytogenes antibodies via biotin-streptavidin bonds to become immunomagnetic nanoparticles (IMNPs) to capture L. monocytogenes in a sample during a 2-h immunoreaction. A magnetic separator was used to collect and hold the IMNPs-L. monocytogenes complex while the supernatants were removed. After the washing step, the nanoparticle-L. monocytogenes complex was separated from the sample and injected into a microfluidic chip. The impedance change caused by L. monocytogenes was measured by an impedance analyzer through the interdigitated microelectrode in the microfluidic chip. For L. monocytogenes in phosphate-buffered saline solution, up to 75%of the cells in the sample could be separated, and as few as three to five cells in the microfluidic chip could be detected, which is equivalent to 103 CFU/ml of cells in the original sample. The detection of L. monocytogenes was not interfered with by other major foodborne bacteria, including E. coli O157:H7, E. coli K-12, L. innocua, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus. A linear correlation (R2 = 0.86) was found between the impedance change and the number of L. monocytogenes in a range of 103 to 107 CFU/ml. Equivalent circuit analysis indicated that the impedance change was mainly due to the decrease in medium resistance when the IMNPs-L. monocytogenes complexes existed in mannitol solution. Finally, the immunosensor was evaluated with food sample tests; the results showed that, without preenrichment and labeling, 104 and 105 CFU/ml L. monocytogenes in lettuce, milk, and ground beef samples could be detected in 3 h.

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84868572167&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84868572167&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-11-516

    DO - 10.4315/0362-028X.JFP-11-516

    M3 - Article

    C2 - 23127703

    AN - SCOPUS:84868572167

    VL - 75

    SP - 1951

    EP - 1959

    JO - Journal of Food Protection

    JF - Journal of Food Protection

    SN - 0362-028X

    IS - 11

    ER -