Engineering of cell membranes with a bisphosphonate-containing polymer using ATRP synthesis for bone targeting

Sonia D'Souza, Hironobu Murata, Moncy V. Jose, Sholpan Askarova, Yuliya Yantsen, Jill D. Andersen, Collin D.J. Edington, William P. Clafshenkel, Richard R. Koepsel, Alan J. Russell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The field of polymer-based membrane engineering has expanded since we first demonstrated the reaction of N-hydroxysuccinimide ester-terminated polymers with cells and tissues almost two decades ago. One remaining obstacle, especially for conjugation of polymers to cells, has been that exquisite control over polymer structure and functionality has not been used to influence the behavior of cells. Herein, we describe a multifunctional atom transfer radical polymerization initiator and its use to synthesize water-soluble polymers that are modified with bisphosphonate side chains and then covalently bound to the surface of live cells. The polymers contained between 1.7 and 3.1 bisphosphonates per chain and were shown to bind to hydroxyapatite crystals with kinetics similar to free bisphosphonate binding. We engineered the membranes of both HL-60 cells and mesenchymal stem cells in order to impart polymer-guided bone adhesion properties on the cells. Covalent coupling of the polymer to the non-adherent HL-60 cell line or mesenchymal stem cells was non-toxic by proliferation assays and enhanced the binding of these cells to bone.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9447-9458
Number of pages12
JournalBiomaterials
Volume35
Issue number35
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Keywords

  • ATRP
  • Bone targeting polymer
  • Cell reactive polymers
  • Membrane engineering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering
  • Ceramics and Composites
  • Biophysics
  • Biomaterials
  • Mechanics of Materials

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