Evidence of Evolutionary Constraints That Influences the Sequence Composition and Diversity of Mitochondrial Matrix Targeting Signals

Stephen R. Doyle, Naga R P Kasinadhuni, Chee Kai Chan, Warwick N. Grant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mitochondrial targeting signals (MTSs) are responsible for trafficking nuclear encoded proteins to their final destination within mitochondria. These sequences are diverse, sharing little amino acid homology and vary significantly in length, and although the formation of a positively-charged amphiphilic alpha helix within the MTS is considered to be necessary and sufficient to mediate import, such a feature does not explain their diversity, nor how such diversity influences target sequence function, nor how such dissimilar signals interact with a single, evolutionarily conserved import mechanism. An in silico analysis of 296 N-terminal, matrix destined MTSs from Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Oryza sativa was undertaken to investigate relationships between MTSs, and/or, relationships between an individual targeting signal sequence and the protein that it imports. We present evidence that suggests MTS diversity is influenced in part by physiochemical and N-terminal characteristics of their mature sequences, and that some of these correlated characteristics are evolutionarily maintained across a number of taxa. Importantly, some of these associations begin to explain the variation in MTS length and composition.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere67938
JournalPLoS One
Volume8
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 25 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Mitochondria
Nuclear Proteins
Protein Sorting Signals
Arabidopsis
Computer Simulation
Yeast
imports
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Amino Acids
Chemical analysis
nuclear-encoded proteins
Proteins
Mus musculus
signal peptide
Oryza sativa
mitochondria
Arabidopsis thaliana
amino acids
alpha-Helical Protein Conformation
Oryza

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Evidence of Evolutionary Constraints That Influences the Sequence Composition and Diversity of Mitochondrial Matrix Targeting Signals. / Doyle, Stephen R.; Kasinadhuni, Naga R P; Chan, Chee Kai; Grant, Warwick N.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 8, No. 6, e67938, 25.06.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{bb0261cbcc964a6fadeb55112c5f9ecd,
title = "Evidence of Evolutionary Constraints That Influences the Sequence Composition and Diversity of Mitochondrial Matrix Targeting Signals",
abstract = "Mitochondrial targeting signals (MTSs) are responsible for trafficking nuclear encoded proteins to their final destination within mitochondria. These sequences are diverse, sharing little amino acid homology and vary significantly in length, and although the formation of a positively-charged amphiphilic alpha helix within the MTS is considered to be necessary and sufficient to mediate import, such a feature does not explain their diversity, nor how such diversity influences target sequence function, nor how such dissimilar signals interact with a single, evolutionarily conserved import mechanism. An in silico analysis of 296 N-terminal, matrix destined MTSs from Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Oryza sativa was undertaken to investigate relationships between MTSs, and/or, relationships between an individual targeting signal sequence and the protein that it imports. We present evidence that suggests MTS diversity is influenced in part by physiochemical and N-terminal characteristics of their mature sequences, and that some of these correlated characteristics are evolutionarily maintained across a number of taxa. Importantly, some of these associations begin to explain the variation in MTS length and composition.",
author = "Doyle, {Stephen R.} and Kasinadhuni, {Naga R P} and Chan, {Chee Kai} and Grant, {Warwick N.}",
year = "2013",
month = "6",
day = "25",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0067938",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evidence of Evolutionary Constraints That Influences the Sequence Composition and Diversity of Mitochondrial Matrix Targeting Signals

AU - Doyle, Stephen R.

AU - Kasinadhuni, Naga R P

AU - Chan, Chee Kai

AU - Grant, Warwick N.

PY - 2013/6/25

Y1 - 2013/6/25

N2 - Mitochondrial targeting signals (MTSs) are responsible for trafficking nuclear encoded proteins to their final destination within mitochondria. These sequences are diverse, sharing little amino acid homology and vary significantly in length, and although the formation of a positively-charged amphiphilic alpha helix within the MTS is considered to be necessary and sufficient to mediate import, such a feature does not explain their diversity, nor how such diversity influences target sequence function, nor how such dissimilar signals interact with a single, evolutionarily conserved import mechanism. An in silico analysis of 296 N-terminal, matrix destined MTSs from Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Oryza sativa was undertaken to investigate relationships between MTSs, and/or, relationships between an individual targeting signal sequence and the protein that it imports. We present evidence that suggests MTS diversity is influenced in part by physiochemical and N-terminal characteristics of their mature sequences, and that some of these correlated characteristics are evolutionarily maintained across a number of taxa. Importantly, some of these associations begin to explain the variation in MTS length and composition.

AB - Mitochondrial targeting signals (MTSs) are responsible for trafficking nuclear encoded proteins to their final destination within mitochondria. These sequences are diverse, sharing little amino acid homology and vary significantly in length, and although the formation of a positively-charged amphiphilic alpha helix within the MTS is considered to be necessary and sufficient to mediate import, such a feature does not explain their diversity, nor how such diversity influences target sequence function, nor how such dissimilar signals interact with a single, evolutionarily conserved import mechanism. An in silico analysis of 296 N-terminal, matrix destined MTSs from Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Oryza sativa was undertaken to investigate relationships between MTSs, and/or, relationships between an individual targeting signal sequence and the protein that it imports. We present evidence that suggests MTS diversity is influenced in part by physiochemical and N-terminal characteristics of their mature sequences, and that some of these correlated characteristics are evolutionarily maintained across a number of taxa. Importantly, some of these associations begin to explain the variation in MTS length and composition.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84879374292&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84879374292&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0067938

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0067938

M3 - Article

VL - 8

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 6

M1 - e67938

ER -