Gender and the academic profession in contemporary Tajikistan: challenges and opportunities expressed by women who remain

Zumrad Kataeva, Alan J. DeYoung

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article attempts to describe the deleterious impact of higher educational changes affecting female faculty members working in Tajik universities in the post-Soviet era. Over the past two decades, the social and economic position women gained during Soviet times has significantly eroded, bringing enormous challenges to education and higher education access, completion and staffing. The demographic and cultural marginalization of women here has negatively impacted university teaching opportunities and the status of women faculty members. Ethnographic interviews–along with relevant secondary data–reveal that despite various official gender-equity policies announced by the state, female participation issues remain prominent in the university. Our interviewees also report continued difficulty entering higher faculty ranks and leadership positions in university. However, significant numbers of women are still to be found there, and they report a workable compromise between being professional educators and trying to navigate a local culture that is becoming more ‘traditional’.

Original languageEnglish
Pages247-262
Number of pages16
Volume36
No.2
Specialist publicationCentral Asian Survey
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 3 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tajikistan
gender
profession
university
university teaching
marginalization
staffing
higher education
leadership
equity
teaching
compromise
education
educator
participation
woman
economics

Keywords

  • academic profession
  • Central Asia
  • gender
  • Higher education
  • Tajikistan
  • women faculty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Development
  • Earth-Surface Processes

Cite this

Gender and the academic profession in contemporary Tajikistan : challenges and opportunities expressed by women who remain. / Kataeva, Zumrad; DeYoung, Alan J.

In: Central Asian Survey, Vol. 36, No. 2, 03.04.2017, p. 247-262.

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

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