Gravitational blueshift from a collapsing object

Lingyao Kong, Daniele Malafarina, Cosimo Bambi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We discuss a counterintuitive phenomenon of classical general relativity, in which a significant fraction of the radiation emitted by a collapsing object and detected by a distant observer may be blueshifted rather than redshifted. The key-point is that when the radiation propagates inside the collapsing body, it is blueshifted, and this time interval may be sufficiently long for the effect to be larger than the later redshift due to the propagation in the vacuum exterior, from the surface of the body to the distant observer. Unfortunately, the phenomenon can unlikely have direct observational implications, but it is interesting by itself as a pure relativistic effect.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)82-86
Number of pages5
JournalPhysics Letters, Section B: Nuclear, Elementary Particle and High-Energy Physics
Volume741
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 4 2015
Externally publishedYes

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radiation
relativistic effects
relativity
intervals
vacuum
propagation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nuclear and High Energy Physics

Cite this

Gravitational blueshift from a collapsing object. / Kong, Lingyao; Malafarina, Daniele; Bambi, Cosimo.

In: Physics Letters, Section B: Nuclear, Elementary Particle and High-Energy Physics, Vol. 741, 04.02.2015, p. 82-86.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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