High-Rate continuous synthesis of Nanocrystalline perovskites and metal oxides in a colliding vapor stream of Microdroplets

Teyeb Ould-Ely, Lyle Kaplan-Reinig, Daniel E. Morse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A high-rate, continuous synthesis of functional nanomaterials using a home engineered reactor is reported. The reactor is able to produce low-cost, kilogram-scale BaTiO3 nanopowders with a nanocrystalline particle size less than 30 nm at mild temperatures (<100 °C) and ambient pressure. Nebulization and collision of warm microdroplets (60-80 °C) of Ba(OH) 2 and Ti(O-nBu)4 very quickly result in total hydrolysis and subsequent conversion to BaTiO3, yielding 1.3 kg/day of high purity, highly crystalline nanoparticles (25-30 nm). This synthesis procedure also enables high-rate production of TiO2 anatase (2.9 kg/day). It therefore provides a general platform for processing and scaling up of functional inorganic nanomaterials under very mild conditions. Low-cost, kilogram-scale BaTiO3 nanopowders are produced via a high-rate synthesis, giving a particle size <30 nm under mild conditions (<100 °C). Nebulization and collision of warm microdroplets of Ba(OH)2 and Ti(O-nBu)4 result in total hydrolysis and conversion to BaTiO3, yielding 1.3 kg/day of high-purity, highly crystalline nanoparticles, as well as 2.9 kg/day TiO2 anatase. It therefore provides a general platform for processing and scaling up functional inorganic nanomaterials under very mild conditions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1275-1282
Number of pages8
JournalAdvanced Functional Materials
Volume24
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 5 2014

Keywords

  • continuous flow
  • inorganic nanomaterials
  • nanocrystals
  • nanomanufacturing
  • perovskites
  • reactor engineering
  • titanium oxide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics

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