In situ microarray fabrication and analysis using a microfluidic flow cell array integrated with surface plasmon resonance microscopy

Jianping Liu, Mark A. Eddings, Adam R. Miles, Rostislav Bukasov, Bruce K. Gale, Jennifer S. Shumaker-Parry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Surface Plasmon Resonance Microscopy (SPRM) is a promising label-free analytical tool for the real-time study of biomolecule interactions in a microarray format. However, flow cell design and microarray fabrication have hindered throughput and limited applications of SPRM. Here we report the integration of a microfluidic flow cell array (MFCA) with SPRM enabling in situ microarray fabrication and multichannel analysis of biomolecule probe-target interactions. We demonstrate the use of the MFCA for delivery of sample solutions with continuous flow in 24 channels in parallel for rapid microarray creation and binding analysis while using SPRM for realtime monitoring of these processes. Label-free measurement of antibody-antibody interactions demonstrates the capabilities of the integrated MFCA-SPRM system and establishes the first steps of the development of a high-throughput, label-free immunogenicity assay. After in situ probe antibody immobilization, target antibody binding was monitored in real time in 24 channels simultaneously. The limit of detection for this particular antibody pair is 80 ng/mL which is ∼6 times lower than the industry recommended immunogenicity assay detection limit. The integrated MFCA-SPRM system is a powerful and versatile combination for a range of array-based analyses, including biomarker screening and drug discovery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4296-4301
Number of pages6
JournalAnalytical Chemistry
Volume81
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 1 2009

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analytical Chemistry

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