'Joined-up' government

An integrated response to communal violence in Northern Ireland?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The growing recognition that social problems are multi-faceted and need to be tackled in a way that cuts across traditional departmental boundaries has heralded the advent of joined-up government. Yet this new emphasis does not appear to have permeated the provision of public services in Northern Ireland in their response to the increasingly pervasive social problem of communal violence perpetrated by paramilitaries against those suspected of committing crime within their own communities. This article examines the response of governmental and non-governmental agencies to this issue and questions whether victims of violence could benefit from an integrated approach. A deep suspicion and mistrust of the statutory authorities and the'undeserving' character of victims currently militate against a joined-up approach.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19-35
Number of pages17
JournalPolicy and Politics
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2003
Externally publishedYes

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social problem
violence
public service
crime
Social Problems
integrated approach
offense
community

Keywords

  • Criminial justice
  • Joined-up
  • Northern Ireland
  • Violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration

Cite this

'Joined-up' government : An integrated response to communal violence in Northern Ireland? / Knox, Colin.

In: Policy and Politics, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.2003, p. 19-35.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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