New analytical methods for comparing bone fracture angles: A controlled study of hammerstone and hyena (Crocuta crocuta) long bone breakage

R. Coil, M. Tappen, K. Yezzi-Woodley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 1 Citations

Abstract

Accurate interpretation of the cause and timing of bone breakage is essential for understanding the archaeological record. However, many variables potentially influencing break morphology have yet to be systematically explored. Focusing primarily on hammerstone breakage, we introduce new analytical methods for comparing fracture angles using the absolute values of the angle from 90°. We systematically control for intrinsic variables such as taxon, skeletal element, limb portion and skeletal age. We also compare experimental assemblages of femora broken by hammerstone and spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta). We show that fracture angles are influenced by breakage plane, skeletal element and limb portion. While the latter two have been suggested before, this is the first time the differences have been quantified. We suggest that researchers stratify their assemblages by these variables if they are using fracture angles in analyses. At the assemblage level, hyenas created more oblique fracture angles on oblique breaks than did hammerstones.

LanguageEnglish
Pages900-917
Number of pages18
JournalArchaeometry
Volume59
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

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interpretation
cause
Bone Breakage
Controlled
Hyena
Assemblages
Causes
Archaeological Record
Spotted Hyena
Intrinsic
Taxon
Femur

Keywords

  • bone breakage
  • carnivore and human bone modification
  • experimental archaeology
  • taphonomy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • History
  • Archaeology

Cite this

New analytical methods for comparing bone fracture angles : A controlled study of hammerstone and hyena (Crocuta crocuta) long bone breakage. / Coil, R.; Tappen, M.; Yezzi-Woodley, K.

In: Archaeometry, Vol. 59, No. 5, 01.10.2017, p. 900-917.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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