Noncompliance with Parental Leave Provisions in Korea

Extending Institutional Research to a New Legal Context

Kyungmin Baek, Erin L. Kelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigate Korean organizations' noncompliance with parental leave provisions. A survey of 1,750 organizations reveals that 19 percent are fully noncompliant (i.e., no policy in place) and 29 percent are partially noncompliant (i.e., acknowledged failure to implement policy). We examine whether organizational characteristics and conditions that predict responsiveness to US employment law are relevant in Korea and apply to a concrete parental leave requirement. Our results show that the predictors of full and partial noncompliance differ, suggesting different motives or processes among noncompliant organizations. Sector and size reduce the odds of full noncompliance but are unrelated to implementing parental leave policies. Having a human resources department predicts that only implementing adopted policies and gender traditionalism increase the likelihood of noncompliance. This is the first theoretically informed investigation of noncompliance with Korean parental leave laws and provides new evidence of the value of institutional perspectives on employment law beyond the US context.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)176-202
Number of pages27
JournalLaw and Social Inquiry
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2014
Externally publishedYes

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parental leave
Korea
employment law
conservatism
human resources
Law
gender
evidence
Values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Law

Cite this

Noncompliance with Parental Leave Provisions in Korea : Extending Institutional Research to a New Legal Context. / Baek, Kyungmin; Kelly, Erin L.

In: Law and Social Inquiry, Vol. 39, No. 1, 12.2014, p. 176-202.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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