Performance evaluation of different designs of back-contact perovskite solar cells

Erik O. Shalenov, Yeldos S. Seitkozhanov, Constantinos Valagiannopoulos, Annie Ng, Karlygash N. Dzhumagulova, Askhat N. Jumabekov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Back-contact design for the architecture of devices is a promising approach to develop high-performance perovskite solar cells. Here, numerical simulation methods are used to investigate device properties of back-contact perovskite solar cells (BC–PSCs) with the quasi-interdigitated, flat-interdigitated, and interdigitated electrode designs. The results highlight the principal differences in the designs of the electrodes and provide an investigation and analysis of the impact of these electrodes on the photovoltaic properties of their BC-PSCs. The effect of the perovskite photoactive layer electronic properties on the performance of BC-PSCs is also investigated. It is revealed that while BC-PSCs with the quasi-interdigitated electrode design can potentially produce power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) well above 25 %, BC-PSCs with the flat-interdigitated and interdigitated electrode designs are more tolerant to electronic imperfections in the perovskite layer and can produce PCEs higher than those in devices with the quasi-interdigitated electrode design. Manufacturing and prospective use of electrodes with the quasi-interdigitated, flat-interdigitated, and interdigitated designs in developing BC-PSCs are discussed from the experimental standpoint.

Original languageEnglish
Article number111426
JournalSolar Energy Materials and Solar Cells
Volume234
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2022

Keywords

  • Perovskites
  • Solar cells
  • Device architecture
  • Back-contact
  • Device physics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films

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