Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections for Wound Healing and Tissue Rejuvenation: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines

P. la Fleur, C. Argaez

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Platelet rich plasma (PRP) injections have been used in the context of musculoskeletal soft tissue injuries, bone fractures, orthopaedic surgery, osteoarthritis, bone defects, joint degeneration, wound care, and other indications. Alternative treatment approaches in these contexts include physiotherapy, glucocorticoid injections, or non-steroidal antiinflammatory medications. Administration of a supraphysiological concentration of platelets allows targeted delivery of a high "dose" of growth factors, cytokines, chemokines and other bioactive proteins to the target tissue. The use of autologous PRP has become popular due to its putative effects on tissue repair and regeneration. PRP has been defined as an autologous plasma derivative in which the concentration of platelets is above baseline. Various classification methods have been proposed that provide more specific categories and are based on criteria such as platelet concentration, leukocyte content, red blood cell content, and the method of exogenous activation of platelets (e.g. by collagen, thrombin, or calcium). Standards for reporting these parameters have not been universally applied in PRP research studies and therefore may affect study interpretation. In addition, there are many commercially available devices for PRP preparation. There is also a wide variation of administration practices that vary by number of injections, volume of injection and location of injections.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCADTH Rapid Response Reports
Place of PublicationOttawa (ON)
PublisherCanadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in HealthCopyright (c) 2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health.
Publication statusPublished - Jun 13 2017

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Rejuvenation
Platelet-Rich Plasma
Wound Healing
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Guidelines
Injections
Blood Platelets
Soft Tissue Injuries
Bone Fractures
Platelet Activation
Chemokines
Thrombin
Osteoarthritis
Glucocorticoids
Orthopedics
Regeneration
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Leukocytes
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Collagen

Cite this

la Fleur, P., & Argaez, C. (2017). Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections for Wound Healing and Tissue Rejuvenation: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines. In CADTH Rapid Response Reports Ottawa (ON): Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in HealthCopyright (c) 2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health..

Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections for Wound Healing and Tissue Rejuvenation: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines. / la Fleur, P.; Argaez, C.

CADTH Rapid Response Reports. Ottawa (ON) : Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in HealthCopyright (c) 2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health., 2017.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

la Fleur, P & Argaez, C 2017, Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections for Wound Healing and Tissue Rejuvenation: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines. in CADTH Rapid Response Reports. Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in HealthCopyright (c) 2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health., Ottawa (ON).
la Fleur P, Argaez C. Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections for Wound Healing and Tissue Rejuvenation: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines. In CADTH Rapid Response Reports. Ottawa (ON): Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in HealthCopyright (c) 2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health. 2017
la Fleur, P. ; Argaez, C. / Platelet-Rich Plasma Injections for Wound Healing and Tissue Rejuvenation: A Review of Clinical Effectiveness, Cost-Effectiveness and Guidelines. CADTH Rapid Response Reports. Ottawa (ON) : Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in HealthCopyright (c) 2017 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health., 2017.
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