Predicting 1-year mortality of patients with diabetes mellitus in Kazakhstan based on administrative health data using machine learning

Aidar Alimbayev, Gulnur Zhakhina, Arnur Gusmanov, Yesbolat Sakko, Sauran Yerdessov, Iliyar Arupzhanov, Ardak Kashkynbayev, Amin Zollanvari, Abduzhappar Gaipov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus (DM) affects the quality of life and leads to disability, high morbidity, and premature mortality. DM is a risk factor for cardiovascular, neurological, and renal diseases, and places a major burden on healthcare systems globally. Predicting the one-year mortality of patients with DM can considerably help clinicians tailor treatments to patients at risk. In this study, we aimed to show the feasibility of predicting the one-year mortality of DM patients based on administrative health data. We use clinical data for 472,950 patients that were admitted to hospitals across Kazakhstan between mid-2014 to December 2019 and were diagnosed with DM. The data was divided into four yearly-specific cohorts (2016-, 2017-, 2018-, and 2019-cohorts) to predict mortality within a specific year based on clinical and demographic information collected up to the end of the preceding year. We then develop a comprehensive machine learning platform to construct a predictive model of one-year mortality for each year-specific cohort. In particular, the study implements and compares the performance of nine classification rules for predicting the one-year mortality of DM patients. The results show that gradient-boosting ensemble learning methods perform better than other algorithms across all year-specific cohorts while achieving an area under the curve (AUC) between 0.78 and 0.80 on independent test sets. The feature importance analysis conducted by calculating SHAP (SHapley Additive exPlanations) values shows that age, duration of diabetes, hypertension, and sex are the top four most important features for predicting one-year mortality. In conclusion, the results show that it is possible to use machine learning to build accurate predictive models of one-year mortality for DM patients based on administrative health data. In the future, integrating this information with laboratory data or patients’ medical history could potentially boost the performance of the predictive models.
Original languageEnglish
JournalScientific Reports
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2023

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Predicting 1-year mortality of patients with diabetes mellitus in Kazakhstan based on administrative health data using machine learning'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this