Quantitative characterization of collagen in the fibrotic capsule surrounding implanted polymeric microparticles through second harmonic generation imaging

Dana Akilbekova, Kaitlin M. Bratlie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The collagenous capsule formed around an implant will ultimately determine the nature of its in vivo fate. To provide a better understanding of how surface modifications can alter the collagen orientation and composition in the fibrotic capsule, we used second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy to evaluate collagen organization and structure generated in mice subcutaneously injected with chemically functionalized polystyrene particles. SHG is sensitive to the orientation of a molecule, making it a powerful tool for measuring the alignment of collagen fibers. Additionally, SHG arises from the second order susceptibility of the interrogated molecule in response to the electric field. Variation in these tensor components distinguishes different molecular sources of SHG, providing collagen type specificity. Here, we demonstrated the ability of SHG to differentiate collagen type I and type III quantitatively and used this method to examine fibrous capsules of implanted polystyrene particles. Data presented in this work shows a wide range of collagen fiber orientations and collagen compositions in response to surface functionalized polystyrene particles. Dimethylamino functionalized particles were able to form a thin collagenous matrix resembling healthy skin. These findings have the potential to improve the fundamental understanding of how material properties influence collagen organization and composition quantitatively.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0130386
JournalPLoS One
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 30 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Harmonic generation
Capsules
collagen
Collagen
image analysis
Imaging techniques
Polystyrenes
polystyrenes
Chemical analysis
Molecules
Fiber reinforced materials
Collagen Type I
electric field
Tensors
Surface treatment
Microscopy
Materials properties
Skin
Microscopic examination
Electric fields

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Quantitative characterization of collagen in the fibrotic capsule surrounding implanted polymeric microparticles through second harmonic generation imaging. / Akilbekova, Dana; Bratlie, Kaitlin M.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 10, No. 6, e0130386, 30.06.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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