Reconceptualizing Psychological Climate in a Retail Service Environment

A Multiple-Stakeholder Perspective

Michael J. Burke, Chester C. Borucki, Amy E. Hurley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

121 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Confirmatory factor analyses of a priori models of psychological climate were conducted with data collected from 18,457 sales personnel in 567 stores in five regions of a national retail organization. The results provide good support for viewing employee work-climate perceptions as composed of two higher order factors-concern for employees and concern for customers. These higher order factors are posited to reflect employees' cognitive appraisals of the behavior of agents toward (a) employees' well-being in the organizations internal environment and (b) the well-being of other organizational constituencies or stakeholders (e.g., customers) in the task environment, respectively. The implications of a multiple-stakeholder perspective for extending notions of psychological climate are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)717-729
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume77
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1992
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Climate
Psychology
Psychological Models
Statistical Factor Analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Reconceptualizing Psychological Climate in a Retail Service Environment : A Multiple-Stakeholder Perspective. / Burke, Michael J.; Borucki, Chester C.; Hurley, Amy E.

In: Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 77, No. 5, 10.1992, p. 717-729.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{f240b55b86414c5188f2e4d7d0d238f6,
title = "Reconceptualizing Psychological Climate in a Retail Service Environment: A Multiple-Stakeholder Perspective",
abstract = "Confirmatory factor analyses of a priori models of psychological climate were conducted with data collected from 18,457 sales personnel in 567 stores in five regions of a national retail organization. The results provide good support for viewing employee work-climate perceptions as composed of two higher order factors-concern for employees and concern for customers. These higher order factors are posited to reflect employees' cognitive appraisals of the behavior of agents toward (a) employees' well-being in the organizations internal environment and (b) the well-being of other organizational constituencies or stakeholders (e.g., customers) in the task environment, respectively. The implications of a multiple-stakeholder perspective for extending notions of psychological climate are discussed.",
author = "Burke, {Michael J.} and Borucki, {Chester C.} and Hurley, {Amy E.}",
year = "1992",
month = "10",
language = "English",
volume = "77",
pages = "717--729",
journal = "Journal of Applied Psychology",
issn = "0021-9010",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reconceptualizing Psychological Climate in a Retail Service Environment

T2 - A Multiple-Stakeholder Perspective

AU - Burke, Michael J.

AU - Borucki, Chester C.

AU - Hurley, Amy E.

PY - 1992/10

Y1 - 1992/10

N2 - Confirmatory factor analyses of a priori models of psychological climate were conducted with data collected from 18,457 sales personnel in 567 stores in five regions of a national retail organization. The results provide good support for viewing employee work-climate perceptions as composed of two higher order factors-concern for employees and concern for customers. These higher order factors are posited to reflect employees' cognitive appraisals of the behavior of agents toward (a) employees' well-being in the organizations internal environment and (b) the well-being of other organizational constituencies or stakeholders (e.g., customers) in the task environment, respectively. The implications of a multiple-stakeholder perspective for extending notions of psychological climate are discussed.

AB - Confirmatory factor analyses of a priori models of psychological climate were conducted with data collected from 18,457 sales personnel in 567 stores in five regions of a national retail organization. The results provide good support for viewing employee work-climate perceptions as composed of two higher order factors-concern for employees and concern for customers. These higher order factors are posited to reflect employees' cognitive appraisals of the behavior of agents toward (a) employees' well-being in the organizations internal environment and (b) the well-being of other organizational constituencies or stakeholders (e.g., customers) in the task environment, respectively. The implications of a multiple-stakeholder perspective for extending notions of psychological climate are discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=21144482950&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=21144482950&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 77

SP - 717

EP - 729

JO - Journal of Applied Psychology

JF - Journal of Applied Psychology

SN - 0021-9010

IS - 5

ER -