Recovery of long-term natural protection against reactivation of CMV retinitis in AIDS patients responding to highly active antiretroviral therapy

Giovanni Di Perri, Sandro Vento, Romualdo Mazzi, Stefano Bonora, Adiriana Bonora, Marco Trevenzoli, Benedetta Allegranzi, Giovanni Carretta, Massimiliano Lanzafame, Sergio Pizzighella, Ercole Concia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To see whether in severely immunosuppressed AIDS patients (with prior Cytomegalovirus retinal disease) who have significant increases in CD4+ lymphocytes following the initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) anti-Cytomegalovirus (CMV) maintenance therapy can be withdrawn with no subsequent progression of CMV retinitis. Methods: Eight patients with AIDS and one or more previous episodes of CMV retinitis interrupted anti-CMV maintenance therapy following the successful beginning of HAART. CD4 cell counts and HIV-RNA were monitored monthly while measurement of CMV antigenemia and ophthalmoscopy were carried every 2 weeks thereafter. Results: The HAART recipients in whom anti-CMV maintenance therapy had been interrupted had measureable increases of CD4+ T lymphocytes, substantial control of both HIV-RNA and CMV viraemia and did not show recurrence of retinitis during a mean follow-up of 98.4 weeks (range 78-120, SD 15.2). Conclusions: Anti-CMV maintenance therapy can be interrupted with no subsequent progression of retinal damage over a long time in patients with AIDS who successfully respond to HAART with a significant increase in CD4 cell count. (C) 1999 The British Infection Society.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-197
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Infection
Volume39
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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