Simian virus 40 detection in human mesothelioma

reliability and significance of the available molecular evidence.

B. Jasani, C. J. Jones, C. Radu, D. Wynford-Thomas, H. Navabi, M. Mason, M. Adams, A. Gibbs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Simian virus 40 was discovered as a contaminant of early poliovirus vaccines that were inadvertently administered to millions of people in Europe and the United States between 1955 and 1963. Although SV40 was proven to be oncogenic in rodents and capable of transforming human and animal cells in vitro, its role in human cancer could not be proven epidemiologically. The matter was forgotten until 1993 when SV40 was accidentally found to cause mesotheliomas in hamsters injected intra-cardially. Subsequently, DNA sequences associated with its powerful oncogenic principal, the large T antigen, were found with high frequency in human pleural mesothelioma using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Since then many laboratories have confirmed the human findings. However, a few laboratories have failed to reproduce these data and the authors of the studies have claimed that the detection of SV40 DNA may simply represent PCR contamination artefacts. The controversy raised by this viewpoint is reviewed in this article together with a critical appraisal of the reliability of the molecular techniques used to detect SV40 DNA, in order to evaluate the potential aetiopathogenic role of SV40 in human mesothelioma.

Original languageEnglish
JournalFrontiers in bioscience : a journal and virtual library
Volume6
Publication statusPublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

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Simian virus 40
Polymerase chain reaction
Mesothelioma
Viruses
Poliovirus Vaccines
DNA sequences
Viral Tumor Antigens
DNA
Animals
Contamination
Cells
Impurities
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Cricetinae
Artifacts
Rodentia
Neoplasms

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Simian virus 40 detection in human mesothelioma : reliability and significance of the available molecular evidence. / Jasani, B.; Jones, C. J.; Radu, C.; Wynford-Thomas, D.; Navabi, H.; Mason, M.; Adams, M.; Gibbs, A.

In: Frontiers in bioscience : a journal and virtual library, Vol. 6, 2001.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jasani, B. ; Jones, C. J. ; Radu, C. ; Wynford-Thomas, D. ; Navabi, H. ; Mason, M. ; Adams, M. ; Gibbs, A. / Simian virus 40 detection in human mesothelioma : reliability and significance of the available molecular evidence. In: Frontiers in bioscience : a journal and virtual library. 2001 ; Vol. 6.
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