Teachers' Values and Expectations of Technology in Northern Territory Primary Schools

Janet Helmer, Helen Harper, Jennifer Wolgemuth

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Educational outcomes are particularly poor for the 43 percent of Australia‟s Northern Territory
students who are Indigenous, many of whom lag significantly behind their non-Indigenous peers (see ACARA,
2011.) The heavy investment by many NT schools in computers, interactive whiteboards and other educational
technologies can be seen in part as an attempt to ameliorate their inherent disadvantage, thus equalising the
learning opportunities in remote locations. Technology is a response to the need to better engage students and
improve educational outcomes. This research examined motivational, pedagogical and systemic factors that
affect the way technology is used in the classroom. Expectancy-value theory was used as a framework to
organise and understand motivations when attempting to integrate technology into their teaching and how their
expectation of the technology influenced their pedagogical goals. This research investigated what factors impact
teachers‟ perceptions of ICT integration in their classes by looking at skills, practices, attitudes and ability to confidently integrate technology as a teaching tool. Data were gathered through observations of technology-based lessons and semi-structured interviews with teachers in Australia‟s Northern Territory schools. Results showed teachers placed high value on using technology for education; however, expectancy of its success was frequently diminished when teachers perceived barriers beyond their immediate control such as the lack of human resources to support the technology, and a lack of effective professional development resulting in teachers lacking the confidence to successfully deliver a technology-based lesson.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication The Eurasia Proceedings of Educational & Social Sciences (EPESS), 2018
Subtitle of host publicationICRES 2018: International Conference on Research in Education and Science
Place of PublicationUniversity of Iowa, USA
PublisherISRES Publishing, International Society for Research in Education and Science (ISRES).
Pages156-162
Volume10(1)
ISBN (Electronic)978-605-67951-8-3
ISBN (Print)978-605-67951-8-3
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1 2018

Fingerprint

primary school
teacher
Values
value theory
lack
Teaching
human resources
school
confidence
classroom
ability
interview
education

Keywords

  • Technology ıntegration, Primary Schools, Teachers

Cite this

Helmer, J., Harper, H., & Wolgemuth, J. (2018). Teachers' Values and Expectations of Technology in Northern Territory Primary Schools. In The Eurasia Proceedings of Educational & Social Sciences (EPESS), 2018: ICRES 2018: International Conference on Research in Education and Science (Vol. 10(1), pp. 156-162). [ISSN: 2587-1730] University of Iowa, USA: ISRES Publishing, International Society for Research in Education and Science (ISRES)..

Teachers' Values and Expectations of Technology in Northern Territory Primary Schools. / Helmer, Janet; Harper, Helen; Wolgemuth, Jennifer .

The Eurasia Proceedings of Educational & Social Sciences (EPESS), 2018: ICRES 2018: International Conference on Research in Education and Science. Vol. 10(1) University of Iowa, USA : ISRES Publishing, International Society for Research in Education and Science (ISRES)., 2018. p. 156-162 ISSN: 2587-1730.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Helmer, J, Harper, H & Wolgemuth, J 2018, Teachers' Values and Expectations of Technology in Northern Territory Primary Schools. in The Eurasia Proceedings of Educational & Social Sciences (EPESS), 2018: ICRES 2018: International Conference on Research in Education and Science. vol. 10(1), ISSN: 2587-1730, ISRES Publishing, International Society for Research in Education and Science (ISRES)., University of Iowa, USA, pp. 156-162.
Helmer J, Harper H, Wolgemuth J. Teachers' Values and Expectations of Technology in Northern Territory Primary Schools. In The Eurasia Proceedings of Educational & Social Sciences (EPESS), 2018: ICRES 2018: International Conference on Research in Education and Science. Vol. 10(1). University of Iowa, USA: ISRES Publishing, International Society for Research in Education and Science (ISRES). 2018. p. 156-162. ISSN: 2587-1730
Helmer, Janet ; Harper, Helen ; Wolgemuth, Jennifer . / Teachers' Values and Expectations of Technology in Northern Territory Primary Schools. The Eurasia Proceedings of Educational & Social Sciences (EPESS), 2018: ICRES 2018: International Conference on Research in Education and Science. Vol. 10(1) University of Iowa, USA : ISRES Publishing, International Society for Research in Education and Science (ISRES)., 2018. pp. 156-162
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