The Corporate Parent: Residential Group Homes and the Education of Children and Youth in Care

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article is a critical interpretive study of residential group homes as school preparatory environments for children and youth in their care. Utilizing social pedagogic analytics, the paper analyzes the role of residential group homes in the education of the children and youth under their care. Evidence gathered in this study suggests that residential child and youth care staff does not play the expected in loco parentis roles as expected of all care givers by Canadian Family Law. Against the established view that there are healthy and conducive home environments that enhance school learning, group home environment is assessed. Building upon narratives from child care workers, observations of group homes and analysis of documents, the main conclusion derived from this study is that it is high time that child and youth care workers give equal attention to safety concerns for and educational progress of the children and youth in their care.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-20
Number of pages20
JournalChild Care in Practice
Publication statusPublished - Nov 18 2019

Fingerprint

Group Homes
parents
Education
Child Care
education
Group
worker
Caregivers
pedagogics
child care
school
Learning
Safety
staff
narrative
learning
evidence

Cite this

@article{fc844865eb234e30bcaaa79108773232,
title = "The Corporate Parent: Residential Group Homes and the Education of Children and Youth in Care",
abstract = "This article is a critical interpretive study of residential group homes as school preparatory environments for children and youth in their care. Utilizing social pedagogic analytics, the paper analyzes the role of residential group homes in the education of the children and youth under their care. Evidence gathered in this study suggests that residential child and youth care staff does not play the expected in loco parentis roles as expected of all care givers by Canadian Family Law. Against the established view that there are healthy and conducive home environments that enhance school learning, group home environment is assessed. Building upon narratives from child care workers, observations of group homes and analysis of documents, the main conclusion derived from this study is that it is high time that child and youth care workers give equal attention to safety concerns for and educational progress of the children and youth in their care.",
author = "Munya Hwami",
year = "2019",
month = "11",
day = "18",
language = "English",
pages = "1--20",
journal = "Child Care in Practice",
issn = "1357-5279",
publisher = "Routledge",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Corporate Parent: Residential Group Homes and the Education of Children and Youth in Care

AU - Hwami, Munya

PY - 2019/11/18

Y1 - 2019/11/18

N2 - This article is a critical interpretive study of residential group homes as school preparatory environments for children and youth in their care. Utilizing social pedagogic analytics, the paper analyzes the role of residential group homes in the education of the children and youth under their care. Evidence gathered in this study suggests that residential child and youth care staff does not play the expected in loco parentis roles as expected of all care givers by Canadian Family Law. Against the established view that there are healthy and conducive home environments that enhance school learning, group home environment is assessed. Building upon narratives from child care workers, observations of group homes and analysis of documents, the main conclusion derived from this study is that it is high time that child and youth care workers give equal attention to safety concerns for and educational progress of the children and youth in their care.

AB - This article is a critical interpretive study of residential group homes as school preparatory environments for children and youth in their care. Utilizing social pedagogic analytics, the paper analyzes the role of residential group homes in the education of the children and youth under their care. Evidence gathered in this study suggests that residential child and youth care staff does not play the expected in loco parentis roles as expected of all care givers by Canadian Family Law. Against the established view that there are healthy and conducive home environments that enhance school learning, group home environment is assessed. Building upon narratives from child care workers, observations of group homes and analysis of documents, the main conclusion derived from this study is that it is high time that child and youth care workers give equal attention to safety concerns for and educational progress of the children and youth in their care.

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 20

JO - Child Care in Practice

JF - Child Care in Practice

SN - 1357-5279

ER -