The long-term impact of residential provision for pupils with emotional and behavioural difficulties

Peter Farrell, Filiz Polat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As schools, local authorities and governments around the world work towards developing more inclusive policies and practices, arguments about how to provide the most effective education for pupils with emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) continue unabated. The behaviour of these pupils can be extremely challenging to their parents and teachers and there is evidence that mainstream schools are becoming increasingly reluctant to admit them. However, maintaining separate special provision is contrary to the general developments towards inclusion. What, then, are the consequences of placing some of our most disturbed pupils in special schools? Would they have preferred to have been educated in the mainstream sector? How successful are they in obtaining further education and employment? In order to explore these and other related questions, 26 former pupils of a residential school for pupils with emotional and behavioural difficulties were interviewed to see how they were managing since they had left the school. Among the areas we explored were the former pupils' opinions about the quality of education and care they received while they were placed at the school and the impact of the placement on their experiences as young adults. Overall, despite some concerns, the former pupils had very positive memories of their placement at the school and believed that it had helped them to overcome their learning and behavioural difficulties. However, many felt that the support they received after they left the school was inadequate. (Original abstract)
Original languageEnglish
JournalEuropean Journal of Special Needs Education
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2003

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Keywords

  • Emotional and behavioural difficulties
  • Long-term impact
  • Special schools

Cite this

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