The Political Consequences of Party System Change

Zim Nwokora, Riccardo Pelizzo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article engages one of the important gaps in the literature on party system effects: the consequences of party system change. We discuss how existing empirical approaches to party system change do not actually capture the changeability of patterns of party competition, which is the most direct understanding of the term "party system." We propose a measure that does exactly this: the index of fluidity. Applying this measure to countries in South East Asia, we show that party system change is associated with harmful effects, including lower foreign direct investment and deterioration of the rule of law.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)453-473
Number of pages21
JournalPolitics and Policy
Volume43
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 1 2015

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system change
party system
constitutional state
direct investment
foreign investment

Keywords

  • Comparative Politics
  • Cross-National Studies
  • Foreign Investment
  • Frequency
  • Index of Fluidity
  • Instability
  • Interparty Competition
  • Measuring Party System Change
  • Party System Effects
  • Party System Stability
  • Party Systems
  • Political Systems
  • Public Policy
  • Rule of Law
  • Scope
  • Variety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

The Political Consequences of Party System Change. / Nwokora, Zim; Pelizzo, Riccardo.

In: Politics and Policy, Vol. 43, No. 4, 01.08.2015, p. 453-473.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nwokora, Zim ; Pelizzo, Riccardo. / The Political Consequences of Party System Change. In: Politics and Policy. 2015 ; Vol. 43, No. 4. pp. 453-473.
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