KUTADGU BİLİG’DE GEÇEN “BIÇIŞ” SÖZCÜĞÜ VE KAZAK TÜRKLERİNDEKİ “JIRTIS” GELENEĞİ

Translated title of the contribution: THE WORD "BIÇIŞ" IN KUTADGU BİLİG AND THE "JIRTIS" TRADITION IN KAZAK TURKS

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

Kutadgu Bilig is undoubtedly one of the richest in terms of researching our vocabulary and cultural values. In Kutadgu Bilig, the word “bıçış” is mentioned in the Kaşgarli Mahmud’s Dîvânu Lugâti’t-Türk work as “a piece of silk fabric given to people who go to the feast of adults”.
Today, the tradition of giving or distributing pieces of cloth is still alive among Qazaq Turks. This old custom is alive among the Qazaqs under the name “jırtıs”.
First, the groom candidate who goes to the bride's house takes the pieces of fabric to give to bride's aunts and her friends as gifts. Since the jırtıs tradition can vary from region to region in Kazakhstan, the jırtıs consisting of valuable pieces of cloth is brought by the mother-in-law who comes to bring the bride to her own home and is distributed to the girl’s side of the village starting from the older ladies of the family.
In the second case, silk, velvet and velvet-like fabric pieces of the same color are distributed to those attending the funeral of an older person.
The old custom that has been going on since the ancient times is one of the Turkic traditions. The jırtıs tradition, which has a deep historical and ethnocultural meaning has a function of increasing respect and love and reinforcing relations between people who share the good and bad days.
In this respect, we believe that our written resources should be re-analyzed correctly in order to preserve our cultural values, transfer them to new generations and explain them.
Translated title of the contributionTHE WORD "BIÇIŞ" IN KUTADGU BİLİG AND THE "JIRTIS" TRADITION IN KAZAK TURKS
Original languageOther
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Kutadgu Bilig, bıçış, jırtıs, tradition

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